Tragic end of mother only a few months after diagnosis



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Mother-of-two Bec Lancaster-Scully lost her brave battle with brain cancer, growing her "angel wings" after the doctors did everything they could to save her.

Mrs. Lancaster-Scully, of Palm Beach, on the Gold Coast, was a healthy, 36-year-old when she went to her doctor in January complaining of headaches. She was horrified to learn that she had two aggressive brain tumors.

Bec Lancaster-Scully with her husband Joel and the children Will and Kit. Photo: Krista Martin photo

Bec Lancaster-Scully with her husband Joel and the children Will and Kit. Photo: Krista Martin photo

Two weeks after an operation to remove a tumor, he was told that the second had quadrupled in size, causing excruciating pain, swelling and partial blindness.

Bec Lancaster-Sully with the younger son Kit. Photo: Krista Martin photo

Bec Lancaster-Sully with the younger son Kit. Photo: Krista Martin photo

In mid-February, surgeons at the Pindarra Private Hospital in Benowa attempted to eliminate primary grade 4 glioblastoma, which could not be removed because it was in the brainstem.

She and her childhood boyfriend Joel Scully were told to prepare for the worst, with their life expectancy reduced to four weeks and six months.

Mrs. Lancaster-Scully passed away on Tuesday night.

Her afflicted sister Sally Kulig posted on social networks today: "Last night you grew your angel wings and flew to the stars. I know Grandma, Pop and Jasper were there waiting for you to arrive."

Mrs. Lancaster-Scully had already dealt with considerable headaches before her illness.

Jasper, his middle child, was stillborn at 37 weeks.

First son Will, 5, was born prematurely with two holes in his heart and spent seven weeks in the hospital before undergoing life-saving surgery.

The couple's third child, Kit, now 18 months old, was also premature but had no major complications.

The family suffered several setbacks before Bec's devastating diagnosis. Photo: Krista Martin photo

The family suffered several setbacks before Bec's devastating diagnosis. Photo: Krista Martin photo

In February, Ms. Kulig created a Gofundme page to help her sister and her family, raising nearly $ 200,000.

"Bec knows the odds, but she's a fighter," she said. Courier-Mail at the time.

Glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer in adults, has a five-year survival rate of 4.6%, compared to 25% for other brain cancers, according to the Australian Cancer Research Foundation.

More than 2,000 new cases of brain cancer are diagnosed each year, killing about 1500 Australians.

There are no known lifestyle or environmental factors that contribute to these types of cancer.

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