Macron's prickly plan for the restitution of historical artifacts is expensive



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According to a report to be delivered to President Macron on Friday, many African artifacts currently cured in French museums should be sent back to their home countries. The social and emotional price of these historical gems is enormous, but what is the cost of losing them to the museums that currently house them?

A statue of Easter Island or Moai, now in the foyer of the Louvre Museum in ParisRama / WikiCommons

Last year, when President Macron was in Ouagadougou, capital of Burkina Faso, he said:

I can not accept that much of the cultural heritage of several African countries is in France.

This week, your commissioned report on how African artifacts should be repatriated was released to the NY Times. The authors, two academics, the Savoy of France and Felwine Sarr of Senegal, argue that artifacts that were illegally brought to France during the colonial period should be returned if the country in question requests them. France currently has 90,000 sub-Saharan artifacts, of which 70,000 are in the Quai Branly Museum in Paris. The report states that almost 95 percent of the African treasury is kept off the continent by the former colonial powers or private collectors.

All fifteen of Standing Moai on Easter Island, similar to the British Museum Bj & oslash; rn Christian T & oslash; rrissen / WikiCommons

The idea of ​​returning these priceless objects, currently found in many national museums around the world, gained more space this week when Easter Island called for the return of its Hoa Hakananai statue, entry of the British. Museum in London. The governor of Easter Island, Tarita Alarc; n Rapu, told the museum, that while holding the four-ton statue called moai that "you, the British people, have our soul." It was taken in 1868 without permission from the islanders and given to Queen Victoria. As reported in The Guardian, is the latest in a long line of countries waiting for their belongings – Egypt wants the Rosetta Stone, Nigeria, the Bronzes of Benin and the right to keep the Parthenon Marbles (brought from England to Greece by Lord Elgin) is being eroded by Britain's plan to leave the EU.

The Parthenon Marbles at the British MuseumTxllxt TxllxT / WikiCommons

But what about the museums that keep these treasures? The argument that they are guardians of this art and not of the permanent guardians is less and less influenced to & nbsp;the countries concerned. However, many interested museums are keen to point out that not everything has been acquired by malicious means – in this sense, the British Museum began lecturing on the origin of his collection, to show that much was donated or purchased. But what will become of its status as one of the most visited museums in England? More than two-thirds of its visitors are international tourists, and between April 2017 and March 2018 admissions income was only 2.2 million. In fact, the same goes for Quai Branly, who has 1,350,000 visitors every year.

African Exhibitions at the Quai Branly Museum in ParisAndreas Praefcke / WikiCommons

President Macron wants the repatriation to begin in the next five years and the report suggests a change in the French estate law to allow that to begin. In addition, the authors sent the African countries a list of artifacts that France has to allow them to ask for them back. It is also recommending that help be given to help these countries rebuild the infrastructure of the ruined museum in Africa.& nbsp; so that they can & nbsp; take good care of this & nbsp; when & nbsp; it returns & nbsp;It is very likely that the rest of the world of museums will be attentive to see how far France is going to return its African artifacts and the rest of the world of museums is expected to be followed.

Exhibitions in Quai Branly, ParisChatsam / WikiCommons

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According to a report to be delivered to President Macron on Friday, many African artifacts currently cured in French museums should be sent back to their home countries. The social and emotional price of these historical gems is enormous, but what is the cost of losing them to the museums that currently house them?

A statue of Easter Island or Moai, now in the foyer of the Louvre Museum in ParisRama / WikiCommons

Last year, when President Macron was in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso, he said:

I can not accept that much of the cultural heritage of several African countries is in France.

This week, your commissioned report on how African artifacts should be repatriated was released to the NY Times. The authors, two academics, Bénédicte Savoy of France and Felwine Sarr of Senegal argue that artifacts that were illegally brought to France throughout the colonial period should be returned if the country in question requests them. France currently has 90,000 sub-Saharan artifacts, of which 70,000 are in the Quai Branly Museum in Paris. The report states that almost 95 percent of the African treasury is kept off the continent, either in the hands of former colonial powers or private collectors.

All fifteen of Standing Moai on Easter Island, similar to the British Museum Bjørn Christian Tørrissen / WikiCommons

The idea of ​​returning these priceless objects, currently found in many national museums around the world, gained more space this week when Easter Island called for the return of its Hoa Hakananai statue, entry of the British. Museum in London. The governor of Easter Island, Tarita Alarcón Rapu, told the museum, that holding the four-ton statue called moai that "you, the British people, have our soul." It was taken in 1868 without permission from the islanders and given to Queen Victoria. As reported in The Guardian, is the latest in a long line of countries waiting for their belongings – Egypt wants the Rosetta Stone, Nigeria, the Bronzes of Benin and the right to keep the Parthenon Marbles (brought from England to Greece by Lord Elgin) is being eroded by Britain's plan to leave the EU.

The Parthenon Marbles at the British MuseumTxllxt TxllxT / WikiCommons

But what about the museums that keep these treasures? The argument that they are guardians of this art and not the permanent guardians is less and less the countries concerned. However, many interested museums are keen to point out that not everything has been acquired by malicious means – in this sense, the British Museum began lecturing on the origin of his collection, to show that much was donated or purchased. But what will become of its status as one of the most visited museums in England? More than two-thirds of its visitors are international tourists, and between April 2017 and March 2018 admissions £ 2.2 million. In fact, the same goes for Quai Branly, who has 1,350,000 visitors every year.

African Exhibitions at the Quai Branly Museum in ParisAndreas Praefcke / WikiCommons

President Macron wants the repatriation to begin in the next five years and the report suggests a change in the French estate law to allow that to begin. In addition, the authors sent the African countries a list of artifacts that France has to allow them to ask for them back. It is also recommending that help be given to help these countries rebuild the infrastructure of the ruined museum in Africa. so they can take good care of this treasure when it returns. It is highly probable that the rest of the world of museums will be attentive to see how far France is going to return its African artifacts and the rest of the world of museums is expected to follow.

Exhibitions in Quai Branly, ParisChatsam / WikiCommons

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