Scientists have discovered liquid BLOOD in the frozen remains of a 42,000-year-old foal



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Scientists have discovered liquid blood inside the carcass of an extinct foal preserved for 42,000 years in Siberian permafrost, it was announced today.

It is believed to be the oldest blood ever found in the world – and raises hopes of cloning the Lenskaya species of prehistoric horses back to life.

The discovery was made by an international team of scientists who also hope in the future to clone the extinct woolly mammoth of the frozen genetic material in permafrost.

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An image shows the Ice Age blood in a test tube in a laboratory in Yakutsk, the coldest city in the world. The discovery was made by an international team of scientists who also hope in the future to clone the extinct woolly mammoth of the frozen genetic material in permafrost.

An image shows the Ice Age blood in a test tube in a laboratory in Yakutsk, the coldest city in the world. The discovery was made by an international team of scientists who also hope in the future to clone the extinct woolly mammoth of the frozen genetic material in permafrost.

Grigoryev, head of the Yakutsk Mammoth Museum, said the foal's autopsy shows "beautifully preserved internal organs." The prehistoric baby died of drowning at less than two weeks of age, he said

Grigoryev, head of the Yakutsk Mammoth Museum, said the foal's autopsy shows "beautifully preserved internal organs." The prehistoric baby died of drowning at less than two weeks of age, he said

They have already revealed that they are "confident of success" in extracting cells from this ancient foal in order to clone their species and bring it back to life.

Grigoryev, head of the Yakutsk Mammoth Museum, said the foal's autopsy shows "beautifully preserved internal organs."

The prehistoric baby died of drowning at less than two weeks of age, he said.

"Samples of liquid blood were taken from vessels of the heart – they were preserved in the liquid state for 42,000 years, thanks to favorable funerary conditions and permafrost," he said, The Siberian Times reported.

Muscle tissues preserved their natural reddish color.

"We can now claim that this is the best preserved Ice Age animal ever found in the world."

Dr Grigoryev revealed that the foal is in an exceptional condition with no visible damage.

"This is extremely rare for paleontological discoveries because some of them are incomplete, fragmented, with severe or heavily mummified body deformations," he said.

There are no print artists of the exact Lemskaya species - of which the 42.00 year old foal belongs - but it is believed to have resembled this portrayed foal, which is a modern descendant, the Yakutian horse

There are no print artists of the exact Lemskaya species – of which the 42.00 year old foal belongs – but it is believed to have resembled this portrayed foal, which is a modern descendant, the Yakutian horse

The foal was originally taken from permafrost last summer, but blood was only extracted on February 28. His discovery was kept secret until today

The foal was originally taken from permafrost last summer, but blood was only extracted on February 28. His discovery was kept secret until today

It is believed to be the oldest blood ever found in the world - and raises hopes of cloning the Lenskaya species of prehistoric horses back to life. In the photo, the researchers analyzed the blood sample from the foal

It is believed to be the oldest blood ever found in the world – and raises hopes of cloning the Lenskaya species of prehistoric horses back to life. In the photo, the researchers analyzed the blood sample from the foal

The work is so advanced that the team is already choosing a surrogate mother for the historic role of giving birth to the old horse.

The work is so advanced that the team is already choosing a surrogate mother for the historic role of giving birth to the old horse.

The international research team is led by South Korean cloning expert Professor Hwang Woo-suk, who is also closely involved in efforts to use remains of mammoths preserved in permafrost, bringing the giants back to life.

The international research team is led by South Korean cloning expert Professor Hwang Woo-suk, who is also closely involved in efforts to use remains of mammoths preserved in permafrost, bringing the giants back to life.

The foal's hair is intact on his head, legs and part of his body.

Your tail and mane are black, the rest of the body of the foal is bay.

"Having hair preserved is another scientific sensation, since all previous ancient horses were found without hair."

Russian scientists are working with experts from the South Korean Sooam Biotechnology Research Foundation.

"Our studies showed that at the time of death, the foal was one to two weeks old, so he was born recently," Grigoryev said.

As in previous cases of really well preserved remains of prehistoric animals, the cause of death was drowning in mud that froze and turned into permafrost.

"A lot of mud and sediment that the foal swallowed during the last seconds of his life were found inside his gastrointestinal tract."

Michil Yakovlev, the university's corporate media editor, said: "I hope the world will soon find the clone of the ancient foal that lived 42,000 years ago."

The foal was originally taken from permafrost last summer, but blood was only extracted on February 28.

His discovery has been kept secret until today.

Six years ago, blood was found in a huge carcass on Malolyakhovskiy Island, dating to 28,000 years.

Other samples – some older – extracted from mammoths were not found in sufficient quantity for cloning.

Scientists will use today's horses (photo) that are similar to the extinct Lenskaya breed and live in the same region to act as a surrogate mother of the clone. It could be the first step in figuring out how to restore the woolly mammoth and what would be similar to these modern animals.

Scientists will use today's horses (photo) that are similar to the extinct Lenskaya breed and live in the same region to act as a surrogate mother of the clone. It could be the first step in figuring out how to restore the woolly mammoth and what would be similar to these modern animals.

The scientists said they are "confident of success" in extracting cells from an extinct 42,000-year-old colt in order to clone their prehistoric species back to life, reports say.

The scientists said they are "confident of success" in extracting cells from an extinct 42,000-year-old colt in order to clone their prehistoric species back to life, reports say.

Can Scientists Bring the Ancient Universe Stuck in PERMAFROST Siberian for 42,000 Years Back to Life?

The prehistoric foal died of drowning when less than two weeks old and was preserved in Siberian permafrost.

The ginger-colored foal was preserved in near-perfect conditions in Siberian permafrost for 42,170 years, experts say.

He measures 9.3 hands (37 inches) tall and has been trapped in the permafrost since he died.

The foal was discovered in the Batagaika crater, a huge depression of 100 meters in the eastern Siberian taiga.

After several months of intense work on the frozen baby horse, a team of Russian and South Korean researchers are optimistic that they will get the cells needed to try to clone the extinct cold-resistant Lenskaya, which disappeared around 4,000 years ago.

The work is so advanced that the team is supposedly picking a mother for the historic role of giving birth to the old horse.

The international research team is led by South Korean cloning expert Professor Hwang Woo-suk, who is also involved in efforts to use remains of mammoths preserved in permafrost, bringing the giants back to life.

They have been able to get liquid blood, hair and DNA from the animal and hope to implant some of the DNA in a donor animal to create the clone.

The remains belong to a Lenskaya horse that was long extinct, but are close relatives of some surviving horses of modern times still living in the region.

The researchers also hope to clone the extinct woolly mammoth of the genetic material frozen in permafrost using the same technique as the Lenskaya horse specimen.

The researchers also hope to clone the extinct woolly mammoth of the genetic material frozen in permafrost using the same technique as the Lenskaya horse specimen.

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