Monday , April 19 2021

Officially, scientists agree to redefine the kilogram




date-bind-html-content-type = "article" date-bind-html-compile = "article.body" date-first-article-body =

Since 1889, the kilogram has been defined as a bright block of platinum-eridium in a special glass vessel known as the international base model of kilograms. This block is held at the headquarters of the International Bureau of weights and measures located on the outskirts of the French capital Paris.

After a week-long meeting at the nearby Palace of Versailles, the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, which gathers 60 nations, agreed to redefine the kilogram on a small but insignificant base called "Fixed Blanc".

The vote was made to update the definitions of amplifiers (unit of measure of tension), calvin (one of the thermodynamic units) and mole (unit of measure of the amount of material).

All modern mass measures are derived from kilos, whether micrograms of drugs, gold dust, pounds of fruit, fish or tons of steel.

The problem is that the weight of the model changes permanently. Even within its three glass tractors, the model captures precise dust particles and is influenced by the atmosphere. Sometimes it needs to be cleaned, which can affect its mass.

These changes can have a significant effect: if the model loses part of its mass, the weight of the atoms will theoretically increase, while the kilogram should always be heavy.

Scientists have been seeking for decades to determine a fixed value per kilogram derived from stationary physics, according to how they behaved with other measurement units supervised by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

Experts believe that the redefinition of the kilogram represents the most important redefinition of a unit of measurement since the second was recalculated in 1967, a decision that helped facilitate communication around the world through technologies such as GPS and the Internet.

The new tariffs approved by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures will begin on May 20, 2019.

">

Since 1889, the kilogram has been defined as a bright block of platinum-eridium in a special glass vessel known as the international base model of kilograms. This block is held at the headquarters of the International Bureau of weights and measures located on the outskirts of the French capital Paris.

After a week-long meeting at the nearby Palace of Versailles, the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, which gathers 60 nations, agreed to redefine the kilogram on a small but unchanged base called the Planck constant.

The vote was made to update the definitions of amplifiers (unit of measure of tension), calvin (one of the thermodynamic units) and mole (unit of measure of the amount of material).

All modern mass measures are derived from kilos, whether micrograms of drugs, gold dust, pounds of fruit, fish or tons of steel.

The problem is that the weight of the model changes permanently. Even within its three glass tractors, the model captures precise dust particles and is influenced by the atmosphere. Sometimes it needs to be cleaned, which can affect its mass.

These changes can have a significant effect: if the model loses part of its mass, the weight of the atoms will theoretically increase, while the kilogram should always be heavy.

Scientists have been seeking for decades to determine a fixed value per kilogram derived from stationary physics, according to how they behaved with other measurement units supervised by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

Experts believe that the redefinition of the kilogram represents the most important redefinition of a unit of measurement since the second was recalculated in 1967, a decision that helped facilitate communication around the world through technologies such as GPS and the Internet.

The new tariffs approved by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures will begin on May 20, 2019.


Source link