Sunday , March 7 2021

The most prominent MITURI on the flu, dismantled



Doctors at the University Hospital of Urgency in Bucharest have compiled a list of the 5 most common myths about influenza and the influenza vaccine circulating among the population, which they dismantle point-to-point. Among them: "the flu is a stronger cold," "the flu vaccine can cause the flu," and "healthy people do not need a flu shot."

According to doctors at the University of Bucharest Emergency Hospital, here are the most common myths about influenza:

MYTH 1: THE ANTIGRAVAL VACCINE MAY PRODUCE SQUEEZE.
False. The influenza vaccine can not produce flu. It takes 2 weeks for the body to be immune to the flu virus, while the vaccinated person is not protected from any flu or cold (virocide) he has contracted in the meantime. People are getting their shot in doctors' offices or in clinics where there are certainly cool people around them and where they can get a cold / HotNews.ro.

MYTH 2: Healthy people do not need an influenza vaccine.
False. And perfectly healthy people, adults or children who do not have a risk factor for serious illnesses, can get the flu, be hospitalized and even die of the flu. Given that the most affected people can not be identified early, "the recommendation is that everyone, from 6 months of age, should be vaccinated every year," says Dr. Lisa Grohskopf, MD, MPH, a medical officer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Influenza Department.

MYTH 3. THE SUCCESS IS MOST POWERFUL. False. Against other colds or viruses, the flu suddenly starts with a high fever, chills, tremors, muscle aches and headaches. In more severe situations, people may develop severe lower respiratory tract symptoms, such as a severe cough and even pneumonia.

MYTH 4: ANTI-GRAZING VACCINE IS NOT EFFECTIVE.
False. The H1N1 strain is actually H1N1pdm09, which occurred during the 2009 pandemic flu season and was originally called "swine flu". Although not known as the swine flu, the H1N1 strain of this year's seasonal vaccine protects against the H1N1pdm09 strain, so people can rest assured that getting this year's seasonal influenza vaccine protects them against "swine flu."

According to Paul Offit, MD, a professor of pediatrics and director of the Vaccination Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, standard dose vaccines offer the best protection against the disease in children under eight years of age with 65%. Thereafter, the efficacy of the vaccine depends on both the patient's age and on how well the vaccine virus strains fit into the circulating ones in the community.

MYTH 5: I AM THE LAST ONE TO MAKE THE ANTIGRAVAL VACCINE.
False. In fact, doctors recommend that people vaccinate early, against the flu, usually by the end of October, although flu outbreaks may occur earlier.

However, as long as flu viruses are circulating, it is never too late to get us vaccinated, even in January, when it is likely that the flu season has reached its maximum. According to CDC experts, the flu may last until May, so it's not too late to get you vaccinated!


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