Nick Willis Olympic gold medalist banned by doping



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Asbel Kiprop – the Kenyan who beat New Zealand's Nick Willis to a gold medal in the 1500m Olympic Games in 2008 – was banned for four years by offensive doping detected in 2017.

The former Olympic champion and triple world champion tested positive for the EPO drug to raise blood after his claim that urine samples may have been tampered with by ill-reputed doping control officials were rejected.

Kiprop failed an out-of-competition test in his home country in November 2017. His backup sample "B" also tested positive for EPO.

The Kenyan received the gold medal of the Beijing Olympics after race winner Rashid Ramzi of Bahrain did not pass the doping test and had his medal undressed.

The three-time world champion of Kenya, Asbel Kiprop, was banned three times for four years, after testing positive for a banned substance.

Andy Lyons

The three-time world champion of Kenya, Asbel Kiprop, was banned three times for four years, after testing positive for a banned substance.

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Wilis, who finished third in Beijing, was promoted from bronze medal to silver.

Willis, who was approached by Thing To comment, tweeted the news about Kiprop's suspension with a Youtube video link to Kenya's victorious victory in a 2016 Diamond League race in Birmingham, where Kiprop recorded the fastest 1500m on British soil.

But his case was complicated when it was revealed that he was warned in advance of the visit by Kenya's anti-doping officers – a violation of the test protocol. Out-of-competition tests should be given to athletes by surprise to ensure that they do not have time to release any banned substances from their systems.

Asbel Kiprop with his gold medal at the 1500 world championship in Beijing in 2015.

Ng Han Guan

Asbel Kiprop with his gold medal at the 1500 world championship in Beijing in 2015.

Kiprop also admitted that he paid cash to one of the anti-doping police after the test. He denied the doping allegations and claimed that he may have been framed.

Kiprop, 29, who has won three consecutive world titles between 2011 and 2015, said his samples could have been tampered with when he was left unattended for a short time while he got his cell phone to transfer money to the antimicrobial. doping officer.

In a separate defense, he also said that elevated levels of EPO in his system may have been "natural EPO" caused by the intense training at high altitude in Kenya. Another defense used was the medication he took a week before the test. caused the positive result.

The Athletic Integrity Unit, which handles the IAAF doping cases, rejected all Kiprop's explanations and banned him from the competition until February 2022. His results from November 27, 2017 to February 3, 2018 were disqualified. The ban was retroactive to start in February 2018.

"There is no justice in the world," Kiprop said Saturday in response to his ban. "Not all prisoners are guilty. I will consult my lawyer to see if I will appeal in CAS [the Court of Arbitration for Sport], but no matter the outcome, I'll come back stronger. "

Asbel Kirpop (second, R) and Nick Willis (L) between a group crossing the finish line in the semifinal of the Olympic Games in 2016, 1500m.

Patrick Smith

Asbel Kirpop (second, R) and Nick Willis (L) between a group crossing the finish line in the semifinal of the Olympic Games in 2016, 1500m.

But Kiprop's denials throughout the case and a history of talking against doping could not outweigh the scientific evidence against him, the AIU disciplinary panel wrote in its ruling.

"There is, unfortunately, in doping, as in all fields of human activity, a first for everything and for denial, shows the record, it is the currency of the guilty and innocent," the panel wrote.

AIU said that the early announcement of the test and the $ 30 Kiprop paid to the anti-doping official – apparently for miscellaneous expenses like drinks and gas for his car – were clearly improper but could not have affected the test results.

Kenyan athlete Asbel Kiprop and New Zealander Nick Willis are among a tight group in the 1500m Olympic final at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Shaun Botterill

Kenyan athlete Asbel Kiprop and New Zealander Nick Willis are among a tight group in the 1500m Olympic final at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

His case has cast further doubts about the strength of the anti-doping program in Kenya, the long-distance powerhouse that has had its reputation eroded by dozens of drug cases in recent years.

Additional reporting

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