NHS plans for faster stroke treatment will save thousands of lives & # 39;



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sThese changes can become controversial because they mean that local hospitals lose important services, which can lead to political discussions.

But charities said the measures were crucial to saving lives, urging NHS leaders not to postpone such changes.

Juliet Bouverie, chief executive of the Stroke Association, warned that "time lost is lost in the brain."

She said, "When the stroke, part of your brain is turned off. And also a part of you.

"This is because a stroke occurs in the brain, the control center of who we are and what we can do.

"Evidence shows that the reorganization of stroke services to create centers of excellence in stroke saves more lives and allows survivors to leave the hospital early to begin their recoveries at home.

A stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is cut off, caused by a clot or internal bleeding.

Every year, more than 150,000 Britons have a stroke – and it is the leading cause of complex disability.

The units have been operating in London since 2010 and Manchester since 2015.

Prior to its introduction, patients were taken to the A & E department of the nearest hospital in the capital to receive immediate care, followed by treatment in a general ward.

An independent analysis of the change showed that patients are now more likely to receive the right treatment sooner and therefore are more likely to survive and recover faster.

The University College London study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, analyzed data from 500,000 hospital admissions for patients between 2008 and 2016 and compared the stroke survival rate and the time patients spent in hospitals in London and the Great Manchester compared to other urban areas in England.

Naomi Fulop, chief researcher, said: "Our research provides solid evidence to centralize acute stroke services in urban areas. This may mean that patients are taken by ambulance from the local hospital to a specialized center to save lives."

More than three out of five strokes could be avoided if major triggers were treated, such as lowering high blood pressure and increasing cholesterol.

Professor Powis also wants the NHS to avoid further spills by providing lifestyle advice and medication earlier.

NHS England has launched a £ 9m program to support 20,000 people with heart problems in 23 areas with the highest stroke rates.

The scheme will see skilled nurses and clinical pharmacists identify people who suffer from atrial fibrillation but are not receiving treatment so they can receive guidance about lifestyle and help get them to the correct treatment.

Health bosses hope to avoid about 700 blows, saving about 200 lives.

More than three out of five strokes could be avoided if major triggers were treated, such as lowering high blood pressure and increasing cholesterol.

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