Has Instagram become the new human zoo?



[ad_1]

OPINION: Sometime in mid-2017, the influencers were cool.

We were at the peak of Instagram, riding the glutinous wave of unicorn diapers, gently illuminated flower walls, and skinny white girls selling laxative tea. So much so that in 2017, the world's first Instagram museum opened in Los Angeles. That, instead of being a normal museum, showing something wonderful about humanity, has proven humankind to be uninteresting, paying $ 45 to come in and take pictures of "professional influencers" in tubs filled with rubber ducks.

At that point, we were adequately updated with the idea that people could get big money to stand in front of a perfectly colored wall, laughing frankly and holding a carefully placed tube of hemorrhoid cream.

Influencers were enviable, photogenic and aspirational.

CONSULT MORE INFORMATION:
* The Instagram influencer eliminates the account after the reaction
* Influencers who have lost their influence
* Spat loses vlogger beauty millions of followers

We all wanted to travel the world eating ice cream and lollipops appetite suppressants. And we all tried to take pictures worthy of Insta, annoying our partners, parents and fellow pedestrians as we all clapped our hands on the sidewalks in front of that perfect wall of pastel shades.

Instagram's influential Swedish, Natalie Schlater, received a lot of feedback on this post on social networks.

Natalie Schlater / INSTAGRAM

Instagram's influential Swedish, Natalie Schlater, received a lot of feedback on this post on social networks.

But at some point, the tide turned both the aesthetic candytopia of Instagram and the candy-selling influencers themselves. Now, among a growing majority of middle-class circles, you'd rather admit that you're spoiling elephant manure for living than being an influencer.

In fact, mocking these once-aspirational figures seems to be our favorite pastime. As seen this week with the disappearance of the influential Swedish Natalie Schlater, who (as the children say) "canceled" this week after she posted a photo of herself in a rice bikini from Bali, "thinking about how my life is different the man who picks up the rice field every morning. "

Since then, she erased her post after Twitter's avalanche of moral outrage, which had a cathartic cardiac arrest over how superficial or empty / privileged this girl was.

Beauty vlogger James Charles lost a colossal amount of followers after a fight with his best friend.

AP

Beauty vlogger James Charles lost a colossal amount of followers after a fight with his best friend.

Schlater is by no means the first person we like to cancel; We are at the point where this is almost a weekly occurrence. Last month, the internet had a field day knocking down James Charles, a 19-year-old mega-infector who lost colossal amounts of followers (including more than one million YouTube subscribers in a day) for apparently selling his best friend by endorsing a rival company of vitamins. (Yes, I know Google, this is really ridiculous.)

And it's not just the phone-obsessed teens who stick to it. The main Thing on Wednesday it was about influencers who lost their influence. Of course I clicked on him – I am totally guilty of the newest schadenfreudian pleasure in our society.

Of course I am. On one level, we all get jealous of the lifestyle of these seemingly perfect people for a long time, so of course we will appreciate the view of the perfectly pastel appearing walls. Now they know what it feels like to be bored. , insignificant and deflated, as the rest of us do daily.

But you can not help thinking that there is a more unpleasant side to it.

Yes, sometimes influencers deserve all the power of society's displeasure to do something genuinely horrible. But Schlater's comments were simply someone (which clearly is not the most empathic or articulate crayon in the box) by saying something vaguely unpleasant.

It's cheesy, but not bad.

Verity Johnson: "I can not help feeling like Instagram has just turned into another opportunity for the cults to scoff at the less sophisticated."

PROVIDED

Verity Johnson: "I can not help feeling like Instagram has just turned into another opportunity for the cults to scoff at the less sophisticated."

And yet, we're really enjoying invading her and other influencers online for similar crimes. Not to mention devouring a lot of articles on the death of the Insta-star. Not to mention the revelation in the wider popular narratives about how influencers are to blame for everything from the destruction of the Mermaid Pools to Chernobyl to brunch.

We are laughing at his lack of taste, sophistication and general idiocy.

But that is simply cruel. We are enjoying ridiculing them for their stupidity, but we have always known that these people are not exactly bastions of thought leadership. We have not touched twice on pictures of eloquent haiku that they make up in the bath. We like photos of your homeless. So we can not turn away and be outraged at their lack of enthusiasm when we have made them famous and famous.

Besides, since when was it cool to laugh at people for being beautiful, but maybe not so insightful? That's just mean. In real life, you only snort once with a stupid comment and move on. You would not turn it into a human zoo, exhibiting them as proof of today's moral degeneration.

It is just another example of armed "vacillation," in which we constantly criticize people for not being sufficiently enlightened, even though the whole point of "freedom" is actually related to inclusiveness.

I can not help but feel as if Instagram has just turned into another opportunity for worship services to scoff at the less sophisticated. And this is as bad as a unicorn frappe.

[ad_2]

Source link