What are the problems with vaccines? Reliable answers long ago in bread



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The World Health Organization, which compiled the 2019 list of key public health threats, also included vaccination concerns in this top ten threat.

Studies of negative vaccine effects are abundant. Scientific papers are counted in dozens or perhaps hundreds of thousands – from individual case descriptions to large-scale research analyzes and meta-analyzes. Of course, it would be very difficult for a person without medical education to have access to huge medical research databases – the information they contain is such that it may not be enough to read all the important articles, and that is a lack of reliable, brief information it's clear. And because of this, a large part of society tends to believe in a clear and concise but highly unreliable "truth-bearer," whose only truth is their own ignorance.

In search of information on the cause-and-effect relationship between vaccines and various adverse events, the eye was struck by a relatively new and rather comprehensive but clear and informative book, "Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality." It is true that even this "short" three-year book of a group of medical professionals has up to 892 pages, so not everyone – even your own health care and your children – is the human link to reading this cover book at cover, but if your determination is enough, here it is: The book is available online for free.

The book was prepared by the Medical Institute of the National Academies of the United States. In the Committee of Authors of the Book – 18 professors representing several of the main medical and academic institutions, this work was later reviewed by 16 medical and statistical professionals. The researchers focused on the adverse effects of measles, rubella and mumps (MMR), chickenpox, influenza, hepatitis A and B, human papillomavirus, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTaP) and meningococcal vaccines, as well as injection procedures for undesirable effects.

Attention should be given to the title of the book: the task of scientists was not to clarify the correlations between vaccines and undesirable effects (ie that the complication occurred after vaccination), but to establish the cause-effect relationship (ie the complication occurred due to the vaccine).

Controlled clinical trial reports, uncontrolled clinical and post-clinical reports, and individual case reports were used to identify this relationship. The value of epidemiological evidence was determined by these studies: whether medical studies published prior to publication of the book suggest that any effect on the vaccinated person may occur more often than untreated. There was also a search for a mechanistic explanation of these undesirable effects in the evaluation of the results of animal studies and the results of natural infections.

After evaluating all these data, the researchers provided one of four possible evaluations for each vaccine and causal relationship of adverse effects:

  • Evidence strongly confirms the relationship between cause and effect;
  • Evidence supports a relation of cause and effect, but it is not sufficient for a rigorous conclusion;
  • Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the connection between cause and effect;
  • Evidence supports the absence of a cause and effect relationship.

The category "Evidence convincingly confirms the absence of a cause and effect relationship" is not included in this list of assessments because of the nature of science: to prove that there is no cause and effect relationship, it is basically impossible, as opposed to proving existence of such a connection.

Even if epidemiological data clearly indicate that the vaccine does not cause one or other adverse effect, it can not be strictly stated that it will certainly not affect any part of the population genetically or for any other reason. Therefore, even if the available evidence that there is no cause and effect relationship is strong and convincing, the scientists conclude that "evidence supports the absence of communication."

The system of judgments is described very clearly and carefully at the beginning of the book: it does not leave much room for personal interpretations and prejudiced reflections.

In order to convey the information contained in the book as much as possible, this article will only contain information about the most common emotional vaccine against measles, rubella and mumps and its undesirable effects. It should be noted that the authors of the book looked at all the information accumulated between 1950 and 2010, so the undesirable effects of the MMR vaccine are not associated with a specific MMR vaccine manufacturer or the vaccine brand itself (basically it means that the reputation of vaccines younger and safer could have been spoiled 70 years ago).

To read more about the evaluation of a specific vaccine and the specific undesirable effect interface, the book itself should be reviewed, where the reasons for this evaluation and the sources used are described in more detail.

On the other hand, if you want to go beyond the authors' decisions about all possible unwanted effects, you can go to the section of this article.

Evaluation of the causality of vaccination with MMR and undesirable effects

Measles-induced encephalitis

This is an inevitable fatal complication that can occur one year after acute measles infection (regardless of whether the person has been vaccinated). Evidence strongly confirms the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and measles-induced encephalitis, but only for individuals with clearly defined immunodeficiency.

Encephalitis and encephalopathies

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal link between the MMR vaccine and encephalitis and encephalopathies.

Febrile seizures

Evidence strongly confirms the cause-effect relationship between MMR and febrile seizures.

Nefebrile convulsions

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal link between the MMR vaccine and non-febrile seizures.

Meningitis

The evidence can not confirm or deny the cause and effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and meningitis.

Ataxia

The evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal link between the MMR vaccine and ataxia.

Autism

Evidence confirms the absence of cause and effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and autism.

Acute multiple encephalomyelitis

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal link between the MMR vaccine and acute multiple encephalomyelitis.

Transverse Myelitis

The evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and transverse myeloma.

Optic nerve neuritis

The evidence can not confirm or deny the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and the optic neuritis.

Nerve Myelitis

The evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and the optic nerve.

Multiple Sclerosis in Adults

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and multiple sclerosis in adults.

Multiple Sclerosis in Children

Evidence can not confirm or deny the causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and multiple sclerosis in children.

Guillain-Barré syndrome

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Chronic Multiple Inflammatory Polyneuropathy

Evidence can not confirm or deny the cause-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and chronic multiple inflammatory polyneuropathy.

Osteoclonic myoclonic syndrome

The evidence can not confirm or deny the causal relationship between MMR vaccine and opsoclonal myoclonic syndrome.

Chest neuritis

The evidence can not confirm or deny the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and arm neuritis.

Anaphylactic reactions

Evidence strongly confirms the cause-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and anaphylactic reactions.

Transient joint pain in women

Evidence confirms the cause and effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and transient joint pain in women.

Transient joint pain in children

Evidence supports the cause-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and transient joint pain in children.

Chronic Joint Pain in Women

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and chronic joint pain in women.

Chronic Arthritis in Women

Evidence can not confirm or deny the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and chronic arthritis in women.

Chronic arthropathy in children

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause-effect relationship between MMR and chronic arthropathy in children.

Arthropathy in men

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause-and-effect relationship between men with MMR and arthropathy.

Type I Diabetes

Evidence confirms the absence of cause and effect relationship between MMR and type I diabetes.

Hepatitis

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause and effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and hepatitis.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the causal link between the MMR vaccine and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Fibromyalgia

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause-and-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and fibromyalgia.

Hearing Loss

Evidence can neither confirm nor deny the cause-effect relationship between the MMR vaccine and hearing loss.

Conclusions

The authors of the book have confirmed that MMR vaccination can lead to death, due to major doubts about the safety of vaccines.

However, it should be noted that MMR death is only possible if the vaccine is suffering from any disease causing immunodeficiency, in which case virtually any common infection may be the cause of death. In addition, the immunodeficiency status in Lithuania is a strict contraindication to MMR vaccines – such individuals are not vaccinated and are the most vulnerable to various infections, and are therefore at increased risk with those with surrounding infectious diseases.

According to the author of the book, other large "safe vaccine fighters" such as opponents of self-inflicted vaccines, bees – autism and diabetes of D. Kepen are probably not related to MMR. Yes, these painful and relentless diagnoses can be detected after the child has been vaccinated, but it is so significant to state that these diseases are caused by vaccination that people die from cucumbers (because, let's face it, 100% already eaten cucumbers die in the long run).

Therefore, the only really unpleasant side effects that may occur (but not necessarily caused by MMR) are febrile seizures and anaphylactic (allergic) reactions. The latter are usually acute, rapid, so that they are noticed prior to the treatment facility where the vaccination procedure has been performed and easily managed.

Illustrations ULAC / Thematic Map, 09/17/2019

Illustrations ULAC / Thematic Map, 09/17/2019

At that time, on 17 April According to data published by the Center for Communicable Diseases and AIDS, measles in Lithuania was diagnosed this year with 479 people, mainly in Kaunas (232). According to European Union and US statistics, 1 to 2 out of 1,000 people die. The only remedy recommended by medical professionals is vaccination against this disease.

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