These are the most invaded passwords in the world – is yours on the list?



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The world's most violated passwords include names, musicians, and fictional characters. You're on the list? Photocredit: Getty

Getty

Last year, when I wrote about the worst passwords of 2018, it was horrifying to discover that clangers including "qwerty" and "123456" were listed in the top 20.

Predictably, the worst passwords tend to be the most hacked, simply because they are very easy to decipher. So it is not surprising that the latest report of bad passwords – this time from the UK's National Center for Cyber ​​Security (NCSC) – has similar findings.

In fact, the most frequently encountered password was the same: according to the NCSC's global breach analysis, 23.2 million hackers around the world used the password "123456".

The analysis covering the 100,000 most recurring passwords accessed by hackers in global cybercrime was removed I have been pwned– the site run by highly esteemed security expert Troy Hunt.

Most hacked passwords

Caution: this list can provoke the overturn of frustrated infosecos that ordinary people really need to do better. But the NCSC list is not meant to embarrass; the organization wants to educate the public about how easy it is to be violated – especially when you're struggling with your passwords.

I can not post all the passwords violated here simply because of space constraints, but the main ones include the ridiculously unimaginable "password" and even "1111111" – which, frankly, is just lazy. Others included names (I suppose the people themselves), soccer teams (please), musicians, and fictional characters like Superman.

So for your entertainment – and hopefully for some of you, education, here are the top five most commonly used passwords. I also included a sample of popular breached passwords from the rest of the list:

The 20 most used passwords

123456 (23.2 m)

123456789 (7.7 m)

qwerty (3.8m)

password (3.6m)

1111111 (3.1 m)

12345678 (2.9 m)

abc123 (2.8 m)

1234567 (2.5 m)

password1 (2.4m)

12345 (2.3 m)

1234567890 (2.2 m)

123123 (2.2 m)

000000 (1.9 m)

Iloveyou (1.6 m)

1234 (1.3 m)

1q2w3e4r5t (1.2 m)

Qwertyuiop (1.1 m)

123 (1.02 m)

Monkey (980, 209)

Dragon (968,625)

Top 5 Names

Ashley (432,276)

Michael (425,291)

daniel (368,227)

Jessica (324,125)

charlie (308,939)

5 best football teams

liverpool (280,723)

Chelsea (216,677)

arsenal (179,095)

manutd (59,440)

everton (46,619)

Top 5 Musicians

blink182 (285,706)

50 cent (191,153)

eminem (167,983)

metallica (140,841)

Slipknot (140,833)

Top five fictional characters

superman (333,139)

Naruto (242,749)

Tiger (237,290)

Pokemon (226,947)

batman (203,116)

Why does it matter?

Gaps are getting bigger all the time: Violation of Collection # 1,& nbsp; for example, saw more than a billion email addresses and unique passwords posted in a hacker forum for anyone to see. Last year, there were major violations of the Marriott, British Airways and Facebook, among others.

It can be argued that some companies are not doing enough to protect people's data, but there is one thing users can do: take control of their own security by trying to follow best practices.

What to do

Needless to say, if you see your password in the list, you need to change it now. You can also start to follow some simple guidelines. Passwords need to be strong, but they must also be unique in each of your different accounts.

Of course, some accounts contain more sensitive details than others – your email, for example. But in that regard, less than half surveyed by the NCSC says they do not always use a strong, separate password for their primary email account. NCSC itself offers many Helpful advice on your site, including avoiding re-use of credentials and choosing strong passwords composed of three or more random but memorable words.

If this is hard to remember, I'd recommend a line from a book or a song – and also do not be afraid to have a physical book for your passwords. As long as you keep this separate from your devices and not in a text file on your desktop, it's actually quite safe.

Better yet, use a password manager like LastPass or 1Password. This creates passwords for you, which eliminates the need to remember them. They need to be protected with a master password, which must be strong or that hackers can access all of their credentials in an accessible location.

Dr. Ian Levy, technical director of NCSC, told me: "Password managers, be they applications, embedded in your browser or on your device, can help with the burden of remembering many different passwords. Just remember to make your master password strong, along the lines of our orientation.

It's also a good idea to take a look at Troy Hunt's website, HaveIBeenPwned.& nbsp; You can enter your emails and passwords here to see if they have appeared in any breach. For those of you who are worried about doing this, do not be: good to be suspicious, but this site is a great tool to help make sure you're changing your passwords when you need them.

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The world's most violated passwords include names, musicians, and fictional characters. You're on the list? Photocredit: Getty

Getty

Last year, when I wrote about the worst passwords of 2018, it was horrifying to discover that clangers including "qwerty" and "123456" were on the top 20 list.

Predictably, the worst passwords tend to be the most hacked, simply because they are very easy to decipher. So it is not surprising that the latest report of bad passwords – this time from the UK's National Center for Cyber ​​Security (NCSC) – has similar findings.

In fact, the most frequently encountered password was the same: according to the NCSC's global breach analysis, 23.2 million hackers around the world used the password "123456".

The analysis covering the 100,000 passwords most commonly accessed by hackers in global cybercrime was taken from Have I Been Pwned – the site run by highly esteemed security expert Troy Hunt.

Most hacked passwords

Caution: this list can provoke the overturn of frustrated infosecos that ordinary people really need to do better. But the NCSC list is not meant to embarrass; the organization wants to educate the public about how easy it is to be violated – especially when you're struggling with your passwords.

I can not post all the passwords violated here simply because of space constraints, but the main ones include the ridiculously unimaginable "password" and even "1111111" – which, frankly, is just lazy. Others included names (I suppose the people themselves), soccer teams (please), musicians, and fictional characters like Superman.

So for your entertainment – and hopefully for some of you, education, here are the top five most commonly used passwords. I also included a sample of popular breached passwords from the rest of the list:

The 20 most used passwords

123456 (23.2 m)

123456789 (7.7 m)

qwerty (3.8m)

password (3.6m)

1111111 (3.1 m)

12345678 (2.9 m)

abc123 (2.8 m)

1234567 (2.5 m)

password1 (2.4m)

12345 (2.3 m)

1234567890 (2.2 m)

123123 (2.2 m)

000000 (1.9 m)

Iloveyou (1.6 m)

1234 (1.3 m)

1q2w3e4r5t (1.2 m)

Qwertyuiop (1.1 m)

123 (1.02 m)

Monkey (980, 209)

Dragon (968,625)

Top 5 Names

Ashley (432,276)

Michael (425,291)

daniel (368,227)

Jessica (324,125)

charlie (308,939)

5 best football teams

liverpool (280,723)

Chelsea (216,677)

arsenal (179,095)

manutd (59,440)

everton (46,619)

Top 5 Musicians

blink182 (285,706)

50 cent (191,153)

eminem (167,983)

metallica (140,841)

Slipknot (140,833)

Top five fictional characters

superman (333,139)

Naruto (242,749)

Tiger (237,290)

Pokemon (226,947)

batman (203,116)

Why does it matter?

The violations are getting bigger all the time: the violation of Collection 1, for example, saw more than a billion email addresses and unique passwords posted in a hacker forum for anyone to see. Last year, there were large violations of names such as Marriott, British Airways and Facebook, among others.

It can be argued that some companies are not doing enough to protect people's data, but there is one thing users can do: take control of their own security by trying to follow best practices.

What to do

Needless to say, if you see your password in the list, you need to change it now. You can also start to follow some simple guidelines. Passwords need to be strong, but they must also be unique in each of your different accounts.

Of course, some accounts contain more sensitive details than others – your email, for example. But in that regard, less than half surveyed by the NCSC says they do not always use a strong, separate password for their primary email account. NCSC itself offers many useful advice on your site, including avoiding re-use of credentials and choosing strong passwords composed of three or more random but memorable words.

If this is hard to remember, I'd recommend a line from a book or a song – and also do not be afraid to have a physical book for your passwords. As long as you keep this separate from your devices and not in a text file on your desktop, it's actually quite safe.

Better yet, use a password manager like LastPass or 1Password. This creates passwords for you, which eliminates the need to remember them. They need to be protected with a master password, which must be strong or that hackers can access all of their credentials in an accessible location.

Dr. Ian Levy, technical director of NCSC, told me: "Password managers, be they applications, embedded in your browser or on your device, can help with the burden of remembering many different passwords. Just remember to strengthen your master password by following our guidelines. "

It's also a good idea to check out Troy Hunt's website, HaveIBeenPwned. You can enter your emails and passwords here to see if they have appeared in any breach. For those of you who are worried about doing this, do not be: good to be suspicious, but this site is a great tool to help make sure you're changing your passwords when you need them.

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