8-11-1984: First Sisters Become Astronauts and Fly from Earth



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Liputan6.com, Houston – Anna Lee Fisher is a smart figure. He is a chemist and doctor in the emergency department. After going through a rigorous selection, women born in 1949 were chosen to be one of the first six astronaut candidates chosen to board the space shuttle of the United States Space Agency (NASA) in January 1978.

The opportunity to travel off the Earth finally arrived on November 8, 1984. Fisher flew as a missile expert on the two Discovery aircraft, STS-51A.

Fisher was not the first US woman to fly into space. His colleague, Sally Kristen Ride, flew first a year earlier.

And much earlier, two Soviet cosmonauts, Valentina Tereshkova and Svetlana Savitskaya, traveled outside Earth.

However, Fisher, who is a former UCLA student, was recorded in history as a mother, or the first slang of the "mother-mother" to become an astronaut.

Fisher flew using Discovery, a few months after giving birth to his first daughter.

"I was assigned to take a flight into space two weeks before the birth of my first child," Fisher said in a video released by NASA quoted SPACE.comOn Wednesday (07/07/2018).

"I still remember, Kristin was born on Friday, and on Monday morning at 8:00 I attended the meeting."

Fisher said his motherhood did not stop him from fulfilling his dream as an astronaut.

"I want to emphasize that yes, I have children, but I'm committed and I will do that," Fisher said in the video. "I am a Capcom (spacecraft communicator) and at the same time I have a baby and training myself to fly. This is a challenging time.

Anna Fisher (second from right) is the first mother to become an astronaut and fly into space (Credit: NASA)

During the STS-51A mission, the satellites were in charge of delivering two satellites in orbit, namely Canada's Anik D-2 (Telesat H) and LEASAT-1 (Syncom IV-1).

And as the first space security mission, the crew was also given the task of bringing the Indonesian satellites and Westar VI Palapa B-2 to Earth.

Fisher served as a robotic arm operator retrieving two orbiting satellites and leading the placement of two new satellites.

Subsequently, Fisher remained in command of NASA until his retirement in 2017. During his time as an astronaut, he had recorded 192 hours in outer space.

Being a new mother was a challenge for Fisher, but he admitted that he could not perform as an astronaut without the help of many people.

One of them is the caretaker of his son, Kristin, who still smells strong. "Without him, I never got what I did because I knew Kristin was 100% safe and with all the love and attention."

Watch the following videos related to NASA:

A NASA astronaut shares images of Earth sightings in space.

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