Woman becomes the 30th person in New South Wales to be diagnosed with measles since Christmas



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Young man shrinks measles while sitting in a doctor's waiting room – just days after two babies get sick from the infection

  • The Sydney woman probably got the disease in a waiting room of the medical center
  • The case comes after two very young babies to be vaccinated have been infected
  • NSW Health warned that the woman visited several areas between March 28 and April 1
  • She visited several suburbs, including Epping, Eastwood and Alexandria.

Thirty people in the last 100 days were diagnosed with measles in NSW, with the latter being exposed to the highly contagious disease in a GP waiting room.

The young woman probably acquired the infection during a medical clinic in Eastwood, northwest Sydney, in mid-March, when an infectious patient who took measles in Thailand was also present.

The case, confirmed on Thursday, means that the diagnosis rate since Christmas Day has averaged more than two per week.

Earlier this week, two very young babies to be vaccinated had the disease confirmed in Sydney.

A young woman has become the thirtieth person in New South Wales to be diagnosed with measles since Christmas (image)

A young woman has become the thirtieth person in New South Wales to be diagnosed with measles since Christmas (image)

NSW Health warned that the woman visited several areas between March 28 and April 1.

She visited several suburbs, including Epping, Eastwood, Redern, Alexandria and Green Square.

Anyone who has crossed these areas should be monitored for symptoms until April 19.

Symptoms of measles can take up to 18 days to appear, which includes fever, cough followed by three or four days by a red rash on the head, neck and body.

NSW Health's director of communicable diseases, Vicky Sheppeard, called on people who feel sick and have symptoms to call their doctor.

"That way, when you arrive, you can be placed in a room away from other people," she said.

The woman visited several suburbs, including Epping, Eastwood, Redern, Alexandria and Green Square (photo: Eastwood Station)

The woman visited several suburbs, including Epping, Eastwood, Redern, Alexandria and Green Square (photo: Eastwood Station)

The woman visited the Pommery Cafe in Alexandria (photo) on March 29 between 10am and 10h30.

The woman visited the Pommery Cafe in Alexandria (photo) on March 29 between 10am and 10h30.

Sheppeard said the most common place to spread measles is in the emergency department of a hospital or waiting room.

"A person with measles is coughing the virus into the air and, in the vicinity of a doctor or hospital waiting room, a large number of people are exposed," she said.

"In GP practices, we have babies and people with a poor immune system, so it's a high-risk place."

The measles vaccine is free for anyone born since 1966.

Dr. Sheppeard said that the most common place to spread measles is in the emergency department of a hospital or in the waiting room (picture bank).

Dr. Sheppeard said that the most common place to spread measles is in the emergency department of a hospital or in the waiting room (picture bank).

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