The first baby is born after the transplant of the uterus of a deceased patient



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Transplants of deceased donor uterus are viable. So concluded a recent study, published by The Lancet, which announced the birth in Brazil of the first baby on December 15, 2017 with this technique.

The recipient was a patient with uterine infertility. One in 500 women with reproductive difficulties have uterine problems due to congenital anomalies or malformations, hysterectomies or unexpected infections. The only options available to have a child were adoption or surrogate pregnancy.

Before the Brazilian case, another ten transplants of deceased donors had been made in the United States, the Czech Republic and Turkey, but this is the first to give birth to a live birth.

However, donations between living and dead people have not yet been compared, nor the surgical and immunosuppressive techniques that should be optimized in the future.

"The first transplants of the uterus were a medical landmark. However, the need for a living donor is an important limitation," says Dani Ejzenberg, a physician at the Hospital das Clínicas at the University of São Paulo, who led the research.

The find, step by step

The surgery occurred in September 2016. The patient was a 32-year-old woman born without a uterus as a result of the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, which affects one in 4,500 women. Four months before transplantation, he underwent a cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF) that resulted in eight fertilized eggs that were cryopreserved.

The donor was 45 years old and died of subarachnoid hemorrhage (a type of stroke involving bleeding on the surface of the brain). The uterus was removed and transplanted to the recipient in a surgery that lasted 10.5 hours. The operation included the connection of the veins and arteries, ligaments and vaginal canals of the donor and recipient uterus.

After the intervention, the patient received immunosuppressive medications as well as antimicrobials, anticoagulant treatment and aspirin while in the hospital. Immunosuppression was continued out of the hospital until birth.

With information from SINC

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Transplants of deceased donor uterus are viable. So concluded a recent study, published by The Lancet, which announced the birth in Brazil of the first baby on December 15, 2017 with this technique.

The recipient was a patient with uterine infertility. One in 500 women with reproductive difficulties have uterine problems due to congenital anomalies or malformations, hysterectomies or unexpected infections. The only options available to have a child were adoption or surrogate pregnancy.

Before the Brazilian case, another ten transplants of deceased donors had been made in the United States, the Czech Republic and Turkey, but this is the first to give birth to a live birth.

However, donations between living and dead people have not yet been compared, nor the surgical and immunosuppressive techniques that should be optimized in the future.

"The first transplants of the uterus were a medical landmark. However, the need for a living donor is an important limitation," says Dani Ejzenberg, a physician at the Hospital das Clínicas at the University of São Paulo, who led the research.

The find, step by step

The surgery occurred in September 2016. The patient was a 32-year-old woman born without a uterus as a result of the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, which affects one in 4,500 women. Four months before transplantation, he underwent a cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF) that resulted in eight fertilized eggs that were cryopreserved.

The donor was 45 years old and died of subarachnoid hemorrhage (a type of stroke involving bleeding on the surface of the brain). The uterus was removed and transplanted to the recipient in a surgery that lasted 10.5 hours. The operation included the connection of the veins and arteries, ligaments and vaginal canals of the donor and recipient uterus.

After the intervention, the patient received immunosuppressive medications as well as antimicrobials, anticoagulant treatment and aspirin while in the hospital. Immunosuppression was continued out of the hospital until birth.

With information from SINC

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