Rocket Lab launches Mahia's second commercial payload today



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The second commercial load of the Rocket Lab was launched from its launch pad on the Mahia Peninsula.

The mission will put 13 tiny satellites in the Earth's orbit down to NASA, and will be the first time the US government agency has set aside a private rocket to place cubes in space.

The company tried to remove a rocket on Thursday, but the attempt was thwarted by bad weather.

The forecast looked better today, though Metservice said Mahia could be hit by one or two showers.

Wind eliminated the Rocket Lab releases earlier, so the fact that there was not much at stake today favored the company.

This time the ball played and the rocket took off just after 7.30.

Today's takeoff marks the Rocket Lab's third launch of the year (including the successful test flight in January).

Flights will be more frequent. The Rocket Lab plans 16 releases next year.

And its newly-opened Auckland plant is capable of supporting a weekly launch goal by 2020. Ultimately, Beck wants 130 releases a year.

The industry is attracting more and more investors. The Rocket Lab recently raised another $ 140 million in a $ 1 billion assessment (with ACC and Sir Stephen Tindall chipping in) as founder Peter Beck spoke about his company picking up a good chunk of more than 2,600 satellite launches planned for the next four years.

But the last flight of the Rocket Lab also happens the same week that US airlines warn that a growing number of launches are causing problems in heavily overcrowded skies.

The US sea coast may be full of aircraft, but Rocket Lab's Launch Complex 1 on New Zealand's east coast is surrounded by empty airspace. Photo / Provided.
The US sea coast may be full of aircraft, but Rocket Lab's Launch Complex 1 on New Zealand's east coast is surrounded by empty airspace. Photo / Provided.

The launch of Space X's Falcon Heavy in Florida in February, for example, caused delays on 61 flights, and many others took longer routes during its three-hour launch window.

In all, 1400 flights were affected by spacecraft launches this year. The United States Federal Aviation Commission often closes the airspace for hours, even if a rocket takes only 90 seconds to reach space.

This number has to be put into perspective. It is decreased by the number of flights affected by the weather and other factors. Orlando actually had more delays in the days on both sides of the Falcon Heavy release.

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