Sunday , June 20 2021

"I'm here supporting the people of the Wet suwet en": protest portraits in the antidodal field in B.C.



"I am here supporting the Wet & # 39; s people in protecting the sovereignty and sacred right inherent in protecting their land," says Sabina Dennis, of the Daksh Cariboo Clan, shown on Tuesday at Camp Unist & # 39; en in the north of BC, where members of the First Nation of Wet & # 39; suwet & # 39; en and its allies oppose a pipeline project.

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

A remote forest road in northern BC has become a line of political failure between the energy industry of Wet & # 39; suwet & # 39; en First Nation and hereditary chiefs of that nation who oppose a natural gas pipeline in their territory traditional.

Fourteen people were arrested on Monday near Gidimt & en, a checkpoint erected on the road last month. The RCMP was enforcing an injunction on Dec. 14 ordering demonstrators at Gidim & # 39; ten and an older checkpoint, Unist'ot, to stop construction crews from getting off the road. Checkpoints are supported by the elders of the Wet & # 39; suwet? Clan, who oppose the pipeline, but the elected councils of the band support the pipeline and have an agreement with their builders, Coastal GasLink.

The arrests sparked protests across the country on Tuesday. Meanwhile, at Unist'ot, the demonstrators were preparing for the RCMP to get there next. Photographer Jimmy Jeong met some of them and asked why they left. This is what they said.

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Site of protests near the Morice river

Coastal GasLink's

pipeline project

Morice R. Forest Service Rd.

TransCanada's

existing gas

streaming

system

JOHN SOPINSKI / THE GLOBE AND THE MAIL

source: b.c. rcmp; thetyee.ca

Site of protests near the Morice river

Coastal GasLink's

pipeline project

Morice River Forest Rd.

TransCanada's

existing gas

streaming

system

JOHN SOPINSKI / THE GLOBE AND THE MAIL, source: b.c. rcmp;

thetyee.ca

Site of protests near the Morice river

Coastal GasLink's

pipeline project

Morice River Forest Rd.

TransCanada's

existing gas

streaming

system

JOHN SOPINSKI / THE GLOBE AND THE MAIL, source: b.c. rcmp; thetyee.ca

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

I am here to support Unist'ot & # 39; in defending the land against the greedy corporations.

– Adam Gagnon, hereditary wing chief of the Firearms Clan

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

I am here to support the Unist'ot en camp and protect the waters. Our waters were contaminated with mercury. When I grew up, we used to drink that contaminated water. Our fish were contaminated.

– Tange Joseph, Fort Babine

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

We are here to protect the rivers and streams our salmon uses for habitats. This is the territory of our father clan. And in honor of our father we are here. A strong nation.

– Brian and Gary Michell, from Tse-Kya, Wet & # 39; suwet & # 39;

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

I am here for my daughters and the next generations to come.

– Gretchen Woodman, Smithers, B.C.

Jimmy Jeong / The Globe and the Post Office

I'm here because I want to support the people here. And I want to support my youngest son, Denzel, who is inside the Unification Lockdown.

– Art Wilson, head of the Wolf of Kispiox

The B.C. pipeline battle: more reading

Full coverage: A guide to the history of Wet & # 39; suwet & # 39; en so far

Explanation: A look at the complicated interaction of a hereditary system

Gary Mason: The two leadership crises in the blockade of Wet & # 39; suwet & # 39; in B.C.

From comments: "This country has many problems." Readers react to B.C. natural gas pipeline protests


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