Saturday , December 7 2019
Home / canada / Curiosity Epic Snaps Selfie & # 39; on Mars as it moves to new vistas of Mars

Curiosity Epic Snaps Selfie & # 39; on Mars as it moves to new vistas of Mars



Curiosity Epic Snaps Selfie & # 39; on Mars as it moves to new vistas of Mars

The Curiosity rover on Mars captured 57 images of itself, which NASA personnel put together in this "selfie".

Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / MSSS

We all edit our selfies to capture our best side, and the Curiosity rover on Mars is no different, as shown in a new NASA "selfie" launched to mark the rover's last days at Vera Rubin Ridge.

The favorite selfie trick of curiosity is not a matter of choosing the most flattering filter; instead, the robotic explorer favors joining plans to build a composite image, creating the illusion that a companion took the picture. The rover used this approach to "selfies" before the impressive effect.

In the case of this new image, captured on January 15, the final product is constructed from 57 different individual photographs taken by the rover using its Mars Hand Lens Imager. This instrument is located at the end of the Curiosity arm. [The Top 10 Space Robot ‘Selfies’ of All Time!]

While the result leaves the rover with glamorous appearance, the scenario is nothing to mock anyone. The 19th hole of Curiosity, in a place nicknamed "Rock Hall", is visible in the lower left corner of the rover, in the great rock. The image also offers a dusty look to the neighborhood, which is resisting a dust storm now.

Curiosity captured this image as she prepared to close more than a year of scientific research at Vera Rubin Ridge, named after the famous astronomer who discovered dark matter. Now the rover is going a little further south on Mars, toward a site that is heavy in clays (so far it's being called the "Clay Rolling Unit"). As Curiosity travels, it is doing a bit of science along the way, which should help geologists understand how the different types of rocks found in the ridge and the clay bearing unit meet.

E-mail Meghan Bartels at mbartels@space.com or follow her @meghanbartels. Follow Us @Spacedotcom and Facebook. Original article on Space.com.


Source link