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Alpha Monocerotids Explosion May Produce Meteor Storm Next Week



On the night of November 21-22, a meteor shower you've probably never heard of, which stems from a comet no one has apparently seen before, is set to hold a brief but spectacular show.

Typically, the Monocerotide alpha meteor shower peak produces perhaps one or two meteors per hour. It's quiet enough that this annual meteor shower doesn't get much attention. Mostly, their activity is only cataloged by meteor scientists who monitor the rates at which our planet sweeps dust particles and other debris from space.

This year, however, we can be treated to an unforgettable show that we won't want to miss!

radiant alpha monomerotide

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The position of the alpha Monocerotides radiant at 23h50. EST, viewed from North America in the eastern time zone. Credit: Stellarium / Scott Sutherland"data-reactid =" 74 ">The position of the alpha Monocerotides radiant at 23h50. EST, viewed from North America in the eastern time zone. Credit: Stellarium / Scott Sutherland

According to meteor scientists Peter Jenniskens and Esko Lyytinen, on the night of November 21, for 15 to 40 minutes, centered around 11:50 pm. EST, Earth is expected to pass through a narrow, dense cluster of meteoroids left behind by any comet that produces the alpha monomerotides.

At about 11:30 pm EST to 12:10 am EST, the one or two meteors per hour we normally see in this meteor shower will suddenly turn into an explosion that will produce at least 400 meteors per hour.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Where we would normally only see one meteor for this whole period, in instead we could see about 7 meteors every minute. "data-reactid =" 77 "> Where we would normally only see one meteor during this period, instead we could see about 7 meteors every minute.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "As Lyytinen wrote on the Meteor News website, however, there is a possibility that this event will produce the equivalent of up to 1,000 meteors per hour! That is about 16-17 meteors per minute! "data-reactid =" 78 "> As Lyytinen wrote on the Meteor News website, however, there is a possibility that this event could produce the equivalent of up to 1,000 meteors per hour! That is about 16-17 meteors per minute!

<h3 class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "DON'T BE LATE (OR EARLY)!"data-reactid =" 79 ">DON'T BE LATE (OR EARLY)!

Typically, when it comes to watching a meteor shower, if a specific night time is recommended for better viewing, viewers need to watch at the same time according to their own time zone.

As the earth spins in the flow of meteoroids, while the meteor shower lasts all night, someone in Halifax watched at 11:50 pm. AST, someone in Regina would watch at 11:50 pm CST, and someone in Vancouver would watch at 11:50 pm PST

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "For this potential meteor storm, however, this is not the case!"data-reactid =" 82 ">For this potential meteor storm, however, this is not the case!

The flow of meteoroids to alpha monomerotides is so narrow that the earth will pass right through it and out on the other side in that 15-40 minute period!

<p class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "As Lyytinen writes: "Anyone who tries to observe should not be late. The strongest maximum would fit in about 15 minutes, or perhaps a little less. It will end almost completely in about 40 minutes. I recommend starting observations at no later than 4:30 am and if you don't want to miss a meteor, start at 4:15 pm at the latest ". (The times he lists are in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), which is 5 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time.) "Data-reactid =" 88 "> As Lyytinen writes: "Anyone who tries to observe should not be late. The strongest maximum would fit in about 15 minutes, or perhaps a little less. It will end almost completely in about 40 minutes. I recommend starting observations at no later than 4:30 am and if you don't want to miss a meteor, start at 4:15 pm at the latest ". (The times he lists are in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), which is 5 hours before Eastern Standard Time.)

So to see it, at a minimum, watch the following times for the night of November 21-22:

  • NST: 1am to 1:40 pm on the 22nd
  • AST: 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm on the 22nd
  • EST: 11:30 pm on the 21st at 12:10 pm on the 22nd
  • CST: 10:30 pm to 11:10 pm on the 21st
  • MST: 9:30 pm to 10:10 pm on the 21st
  • PST: 8:30 pm to 9:10 pm on the 21st

As you can see, the farther west you go, the sooner it gets, which means the closer the radiant is to the horizon and the more twilight you'll have to deal with watching. This means that this will definitely be an event that favors the eastern half of the country.

Read on for valuable tips on attending the event!

<h3 class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "THIS HAPPENED BEFORE"data-reactid =" 99 ">THIS HAPPENED BEFORE

So how did Jenniskens and Lyytinen make this prediction?

This explosion has been recorded four other times so far – in 1925, 1935, 1985 and 1995.

In 1925 and 1935, Alpha Monocerotide explosions produced over 1,000 meteors per hour – the equivalent of a meteor storm! In 1985 and 1995, hourly rates of 700 and 400 respectively were detected. The exact rate is determined exactly by which part of the meteoroid cluster the earth flies.

<h3 class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "HOW TO WATCH A METEOR SHOWER"data-reactid =" 103 ">HOW TO WATCH A METEOR SHOWER

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "First, some honest truth: Many people who want to watch a meteor shower end up losing their experience unnecessarily simply because they didn't know how to properly prepare for it."data-reactid =" 104 "> First, some honest truth: Many people who want to watch a meteor shower end up losing their experience unnecessarily simply because they didn't know how to properly prepare for it.

So to help prevent this, here is a basic guide on how to make the most of this meteor shower.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "First, check the time."data-reactid =" 106 ">First, check the time.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Having clear skies is very important in detecting meteors. In this case, is critical because up to half an hour of cloudy skies will ruin this show. So check out The Weather Network on TV at Our siteor of our app, just to make sure you have the most up-to-date sky forecast. "data-reactid =" 107 "> Having clear skies is very important for meteor detection. In this case, it's critical, because even half an hour of cloudy skies will spoil this program. So check The Weather Network on TV at our website or our app, just to make sure you have the most up-to-date sky forecast.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Next you need to get away from the city's light pollution."data-reactid =" 108 ">Next you need to get away from the city's light pollution.

If you look at the sky, are the only bright lights that you see street lights or signs, the moon, maybe a planet or two, and planes passing by? In that case, your sky is not dark enough for you to see any meteors. You can catch a shiny fireball, but there's no guarantee you'll see anything else. So get out of town, and the further you can, the better!

<p class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Try one of the many dark sky preserves across the country, or if you're under the light-polluted sky on the Windsor to Quebec corridor, check out the various Ontario Provincial Parks or Quebec Provincial Parks. Even if you're confined to parking after hours, these are often great places to watch (and you don't risk breaking into someone's property). "Data-reactid =" 110 "> Try one of the many preserved dark skies across the country, or if you're under the brightly polluted sky along the Windsor Corridor to Quebec City, check out Ontario's many provincial parks or Quebec's provincial parks. Parking, outside office hours, these are usually great places to watch (and you don't risk breaking into someone's property).

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Finally, arrive early and have patience."data-reactid =" 111 ">Finally, arrive early and have patience.

For better viewing, your eyes need anywhere from 30 to 45 minutes to adjust to the dark. Therefore, arrive at your viewing location about half an hour before you begin (for example, 11:00 PM EST).

During this adjustment period, avoid all bright light sources – ceiling lights, car headlights, interior lights, cell phones, tablets, and computer screens. Any exposure to bright light during this time will cancel some or all of the progress you have made, forcing you to start over.

When you are ready, sit in your chair or lean against the car and look up. The graph above shows the radiant dot & # 39; meteor shower in the starfield, showing where meteors seem to originate from, but meteors can flicker in the sky anywhere above your head.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Source: MeteorNews"data-reactid =" 115 "> Source: MeteorNews

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Courtesy teaser image: NASA"data-reactid =" 116 ">Courtesy teaser image: NASA

<h3 class = "screen-atom screen-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "RELATED: METEOR BEGINS THROUGH ST. LOUIS SKY LIGHTING ARCH"data-reactid =" 117 ">RELATED: METEOR BEGINS THROUGH ST. LOUIS SKY LIGHTING ARCH


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