Elon Musk's SpaceX suffers capsule anomaly during tests in Florida



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A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, carrying the Arabsat 6A communications satellite, takes off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., On April 11, 2019.

Joe Skipper | Reuters

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, carrying the Arabsat 6A communications satellite, takes off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., On April 11, 2019.

Elon Musk's SpaceX suffered an anomaly in one of its Crew Dragon capsules during engine testing at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Saturday, the company said.

"The initial tests were successfully completed, but the final test resulted in an anomaly on the test bench," the company said in a statement.

The issue was previously reported by Florida Today, which said that orange smoke was seen rising above the SpaceX facility, and that the anomaly was contained uninjured.

SpaceX said its teams are investigating and working closely with partners from the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

"NASA was notified about the results of the SpaceX Static Fire Test and about the anomaly that occurred during the final test," administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a tweet.

"That is why we have tested, we will learn, make the necessary adjustments and move forward safely with our Commercial Team Program," he added.

NASA has awarded SpaceX and Boeing a total of $ 6.8 billion to build rockets and capsule systems to launch astronauts into orbiting American soil.

In March, privately-owned SpaceX successfully completed its mission to send an unmanned capsule to the International Space Station and returned safely to Earth, a mission seen as crucial to NASA's plans to resume the human space flight of the North Ground -American.

SpaceX's first test flight will be launched in July with US astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken.

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